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School delivery: Royer’s participates in Career Vehicle Day at Hoover Elementary

Megan Zeller is a designer at Royer’s Camp Hill store, but she first joined the company as a contract driver for Valentine’s Day.

She brought that delivery experience to Career Vehicle Day at Hoover Elementary School in Camp Hill. Along with sales associate Tracy McEldowney, the Royer’s colleagues explained what it’s like to be a delivery driver to five different groups of students during the morning event.

Royer’s delivery van was among one-dozen vehicles parked outside the school and highlighted careers in everything from package delivery and TV news to police and EMS.

When delivering delicate flowers, Megan said, “We’ve got to be careful, we’ve got to be smart, we’ve got to be able to lift heavy things, too, because there are a lot of heavy things we deliver.”

With the assistance of computer tablets, Royer’s drivers load packages into their vehicles and then deliver them. Megan emphasized the importance of being reliable, “to be where you need to be on time.”

Drivers must be licensed, of course, but they also have to pass a ride-along with a Royer’s manager to confirm that they operate safely when behind the wheel.

Watching speed, checking work

“A little fun fact,” Megan told the students and their teacher, “is that when this tablet is with the driver, we can tell how fast they’re going. So we can tell if somebody is driving over the speed of 60, and how many times they’ve gone over the speed of 60, and then we can talk to them when they come back.”

The students learned that a driver deals with all manner of weather, from lovely to cold and slippery. Megan asked the students what a driver should do if delivering to a house where no one was home and the temperature was too cold to leave the flowers outside.

“Yeah, I might have to bring [the flowers] back to the shop,” she said. “I might have to go to a neighbor’s house.”

Not only do their tablets help the drivers keep track of deliveries, but they keep the store manager in the loop. If Aunt Tilly calls wondering where her order is, Megan said, the store manager can look at the status based on information shared from the tablet.

Tracy said a teacher’s adage to check work before turning it in also applies in the flower business. Clutching a big white stuffed bear and holding two Mylar balloons, she urged the students:

“Just like your teacher tells you now before you turn in your test, check your work, well, you have to keep checking your work,” Tracy said. “Because the driver has to check his work to make sure he gets the righty teddy bear to the right person.”

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