skip to main content

We’re offering a holiday wreath-decorating class Nov. 16 and 18 in seven stores

Do-it-yourself is a whole lot easier when you start with some knowhow.

If attempts at wreath decorating have had you going in circles, or if you haven’t tried for lack of confidence or opportunity, then Royer’s is here to help.

Royer’s is hosting a holiday wreath-decorating class in seven stores Nov. 16 and 18.

Participants will learn how to make bows, set a festive table, and care for poinsettias. Of course, Royer’s staff will be available to answer questions about holiday decorating.

The cost for the 90-minute class is $50 per person and includes a fresh wreath, bows and decorations.

Participants will receive a 15 percent discount on any in-store Christmas purchase that evening.

Each class is limited to 10 people, so reserve a spot by calling your nearest store:

6:30 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 16

  • Lebanon, 810 S. 12th St.; 717-273-2683
  • Wernersville, 366 E. Penn Ave.; 610-678-7370
  • Lancaster West, 201 Rohrerstown Road; 717-397-0376
  • West York, 805 Loucks Road; 717-854-7733

5:30 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 18

  • Chambersburg, 7 St. Paul Drive; 717-263-1313
  • Camp Hill, 3015 Gettysburg Road; 717-730-4090
  • Carlisle, 100 York Road; 717-241-6100

Oh, Atlanta, we hear you calling

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

We don’t procrastinate when it comes to holiday shopping. In fact, no sooner is one Christmas in the rearview mirror than we start planning for the next one.

It’s not that we’re eager for the passage of time. Rather, we’re beckoned by AmericasMart in Atlanta, which describes itself as the nation’s leading gift, home furnishings and area rug wholesale marketplace.

In Atlanta, we might purchase containers bearing a Christmas decoration, or snowflake or snowman stick-ins to complement an arrangement. We source Christmas décor at AmericasMart but also gifts that customers will give at the holidays, such as a picture frame.

A half-dozen Royer’s representatives visit AmericasMart’s three-building, 7 million-square-foot complex every January, buying gifts and arrangement accents for the next Christmas season, and again in July, when the focus will be on the next spring.

Focus on larger gifts

Jenni Eberly, Royer’s market manager, has made six trips to Atlanta, so she’s a veteran now. But as a first-time visitor, she found the experience daunting.

“It’s overwhelming,” she said, “looking at all that merchandise set out in the displays. Because then you have to take these huge displays and then pick out what you’re going to buy.”

As vast as AmericasMart is, Royer’s spends most of its time on five floral and holiday floors. In July, the group arrived in Atlanta on a Wednesday and worked through Friday. The pace is constant, and even lunch and dinner conversation turns to what each of them has seen from vendors.

Geoff Royer, whose great-grandparents started Royer’s, coordinates the Atlanta trips. He sets up meetings with specific vendors. He also arms each member of the Royer’s delegation with a folder that identifies, by holiday, items on their shopping list.

The needs range from broad to specific. In January, some of the focus was on larger gifts, such as clocks, afghans and pillows that are relatively new for Royer’s. In July, one of the goals was to find new versions of a heart stick-in and accent ribbon to give a new look to an existing arrangement.

Erica Bixby, Royer’s store manager in Lebanon, has been to Atlanta three times. With experience, she has learned to think beyond the initial appeal of new products to identify how they will work in Royer’s stores.

How will they complement other items, and will they work given the price at which they will have to sell, including once freight costs are factored in?

Something might look nice, Erica suggested, “but you can’t really sell it for $50.”

Moments of inspiration

Technology has made it easier to document the trips. Photos taken with a tablet or smart phone are invaluable for jogging memories. After all, Christmas giftware purchased in January won’t arrive until summer or fall.

Photos also capture moments of inspiration.

“I have a bunch of things that I liked for silks,” Erica said, with an eye toward Royer’s crafting similar arrangements in-house rather than buying them already made.

“Or I take pictures of displays that I’d like to duplicate in the stores,” Jenni added.

On her phone, Jenni pulled up a photo showing how one vendor used eye hooks and ropes to display pillows.

“It’s up, it’s still in the display, but it’s out of the way,” Jenni said, noting that pillows are vulnerable in a flower shop, where the need to water plants is constant.

One week after returning from the July trip, Erica and Jenni were in Royer’s central design department in Lebanon. Looking around them, at tables filled with arrangements being created or revamped for fall debuts, they estimated that 30 percent of the items were from Atlanta.

“That container, that container, that container,” Jenni said, pointing at specific arrangements. “That vase. Those deer [figures]. Those are all things that we picked up in January.”

News media visits Royer’s version of Santa’s workshop

thumb_img_9261_1024

We spread holiday cheer. We have a busy workshop. We deliver to peoples’ homes.

Royer’s has more than a little in common with Santa, and we like to show off our version of the North Pole. That’s why we have a standing offer for the news media to visit our central design department in Lebanon and our stores to capture a flavor of the season.

LEBANON DAILY NEWS
On Dec. 7, we welcomed the Lebanon Daily News to our Lebanon complex. The resulting video, set to a jaunty tune, shows how we decorate our Tartan Poinsettia:

69 NEWS BERKS EDITION
Within hours of the Daily News visiting, so, too, did WFMZ-TV/Channel 69 from Berks County. The TV station toured central design and interviewed our store managers in Lebanon, Erica Bixby (photo, top), and Reading, Amy Michalski, for their takes on the busy holiday season.

Poinsettia business ‘poppin” for local flower shops

The making of our Tartan Poinsettia

Inside our version of Santa’s workshop, the talented employees of Royer’s are handcrafting thousands of holiday arrangements in our central design department.

Here’s a glimpse into the making of just one version: Our Tartan Poinsettia, featuring five-plus blooms and measuring 16 to 18 inches in height.

We’d like to make one especially for you. It’s as easy as clicking here to place your order.

New Christmas decorations are on the march to our stores

We’ll have a fresh look this holiday season as we introduce a variety of new store decorations, from candles and gift-wrapped packages to ornamental stars and toy soldiers standing 8 feet or more.

They’ll be unveiled publicly in early November, but we thought you might enjoy a sneak peek.

 

‘One Tank Trip’ takes 69 News viewers behind the scenes to show how Royer’s prepares for the holidays

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

What was an Allentown-based TV news station that has a Berks County edition doing at Royer’s corporate complex in Lebanon?

Seeing how merry is made, that’s what.

WFMZ-TV’s 69 News sent reporter Karin Mallett and photographer Patrick Manwiller to Royer’s as part of the station’s weekly “One Tank Trip” series.

Royer’s has three Berks County stores, in Reading, Shillington and Wernersville.

Tom Royer, one of Royer’s third-generation family owners, showed his guests the Lebanon operations, which include the company’s flagship store, distribution center, greenhouses, and central design department.

“Like Santa’s workshop,” Mallett said in her story’s introduction, describing central design, “but in lieu of toys, flowers. Lots of them. About 20,000 poinsettias will go out for the holiday.”

You can view the story here:

video platformvideo managementvideo solutionsvideo player

‘Holiday Mail for Heroes’ collects hundreds of cards, coloring pages for active military and veterans in 22 counties in central Pennsylvania

Holiday Mail for Heroes 2016

Thanks to everyone who contributed cards and coloring pages for active military and veterans as part of the American Red Cross’ “Holiday Mail for Heroes” program.

From Nov. 11-25, we invited the public to drop off the cards and coloring pages at any Royer’s store. The donated items are destined for military installations, VFWs, American Legions, the Lebanon VA and retirement homes in 22 counties in central Pennsylvania.

The American Red Cross prevents and alleviates human suffering in the face of emergencies by mobilizing the power of volunteers and the generosity of donors. Last year in central Pennsylvania, the Red Cross assisted close to 4,000 people affected by more than 400 local disasters.

Photo, from left, Dena Eberhart, human resources manager, Royer’s, and Kathy Doran, regional service to the armed forces director, American Red Cross.

Royer’s to honor active military and veterans by collecting ‘Holiday Mail for Heroes’ Nov. 11-25 in all stores

DSC_0279[1]

Royer’s Flowers will collect cards and coloring pages for active military and veterans in each of its stores Nov. 11-25 as part of the American Red Cross’ “Holiday Mail for Heroes” program.

Collected cards and coloring pages will be handed over to the Red Cross, whose volunteers will organize them for delivery. Destinations include military installations, VFWs, American Legions, the Lebanon VA and retirement homes in 22 counties in central Pennsylvania.

Cards may be dropped off at any Royer’s during normal business hours. Free coloring pages are available at the stores or can be downloaded here:

Christmas Tree

Ornament

Santa

Reindeer

Dreidel

The Red Cross offers these guidelines for preparing cards:

  • Use generic salutations such as “Dear Service Member” as cards addressed to specific individuals cannot be delivered through this program.
  • Include messages of support and thanks.
  • Sign your name to them.
  • Don’t include letters or other personal information (photos, addresses).
  • Refrain from choosing cards with glitter.

The American Red Cross (redcross.org/centralpa) prevents and alleviates human suffering in the face of emergencies by mobilizing the power of volunteers and the generosity of donors. Last year in central Pennsylvania, the Red Cross assisted close to 4,000 people affected by more than 400 local disasters.

‘Homespun Holiday’ selected as winning entry in our name-the-Christmas-arrangement contest

It was like a Christmas present in need of a bow.

croppedRoyer's new Christmas arrangement

We had developed a new arrangement for this holiday season.

It would come in a red mason jar and include red carnations, white alstroemeria, hypericum, tips of Douglas fir and white pine, pinecones, and shiny red stick-ins.

The only ingredient missing was a name.

But that has been taken care of, too, thanks to more than 450 entries in our online name-the-arrangement contest.

The winning entry: Homespun Holiday

Three people submitted the winning name, and as their prize they will receive one of the arrangements in early December when it becomes available to the public. The winners are Lori Heisey of Columbia; Katharine Hoch of Hummelstown; and Diana Myers of York.

“We received many thoughtful suggestions, but as soon as we saw ‘Homespun Holiday’ we knew it was the one,” said Greg Royer, president and CEO of Royer’s. “Thanks to our winners and to everyone else who submitted names. We can’t wait to introduce the Homespun Holiday arrangement.”

5 ways for children to celebrate National Grandparents Day

Royer'scroppedDollarphotoclub_71808645

Marian McQuade was an expert in grandparenting. A West Virginia mother of 15, she had 43 grandchildren and 15 great-grandchildren.

If McQuade’s name doesn’t ring a bill, her work no doubt will. She was the founder of National Grandparents Day, which President Jimmy Carter signed into law in 1978.

National Grandparents Day is held on the first Sunday after Labor Day (Sept. 13 in 2015; Sept. 11 in 2016; Sept. 10 in 2017). September was chosen to signify the autumn years of life, according to Legacy Project.

To help celebrate the holiday, the Royer’s Kids Club offers five activities that children can do for or with their grandparents:

Send flowers: OK, this is an obvious one, but our founder, Hannah “Mom” Royer, was a doting grandmother and much loved by her grandchildren, as was her husband, Lester.

Make a card: Draw a pretty picture and write a note to tell your grandparents how much they mean to you.

Interview them: Grandma and grandpa have seen and experienced a lot of things in their lives. This handy interview form can help get you started. Listen closely to their answers because you can learn a lot.

Trace your family tree: Here’s a family tree chart that will make it easy to identify the people in your family by generation.

Read a book together: The kids club is a big believer in the power of reading. Here’s a terrific reading list to get you started.

Of course, there is an endless list of things that grandchildren and grandparents can do together.

What are some of your favorites?