skip to main content

Royer’s Stems Hunger collects nearly 1,700 pounds of food for area food banks

Greg Royer, president and CEO of Royer’s Flowers, and David Carl, corporate and foundation giving manager, Central Pennsylvania Food Bank.

Royer’s Flowers & Gifts’ annual food drive collected 1,699 pounds of nonperishable items, pushing the total to more than seven tons since the event began in 2011.

Royer’s Stems Hunger, which took place June 16-30, collected 166 pounds for the Greater Berks Food Bank and 1,533 pounds for the Central Pennsylvania Food Bank.

For each nonperishable food item, donors received a free carnation.

Besides Royer’s 16 stores, the food drop-off locations included eight Drayer Physical Therapy Institute locations in the area.

Lebanon fourth-grader Butts wins Royer’s Kids Club birthday card design contest

Jamie Butts of Lebanon said her daughter, Camryn, plays soccer, basketball and swims. But her interests extend beyond sports.

“Drawing and coloring has always been something that she has liked,” Jamie said.

Camryn is a talented artist, too, as evidenced by the Cornwall Elementary fourth-grader winning this year’s Royer’s Flowers & Gifts Kids Club birthday card design contest.

Her design will be featured on the electronic card that kids club members will receive on their birthdays in the coming year. Her prize is a free flower delivery on her next birthday.

The Royer’s Kids Club is free to ages 5 to 12. With parental permission, children may register for the kids club at any Royer’s store or online at royers.com/kidsclub. Kids club benefits include a membership card, online activities, quarterly e-mail newsletter, contests and in-store events.

This year’s online name-the-arrangement contest runs July 15-31

Royer’s Flowers & Gifts’ annual name-the-arrangement contest is four times more fun this summer.

The winning name will apply to one arrangement (left) that’s available in four sizes, small through extra-large.

The person who submits the winning name will receive a small version of the arrangement (retail value $21.99), which features yellow alstroemeria and daisy pom pons, peach hypericum and mini carnations, and orange carnations.

To enter the contest, visit royers.com/contest.

Limit one entry daily per email address, July 15 through July 31.

An artist’s pallet

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

When boxes of fresh flowers arrive at our distribution center in Lebanon, often they are stacked on wooden pallets. Needless to say, that’s a lot of wooden pallets over time.

As noted by Cheryl Brill, Royer’s vice president of retail operations, pallets became all the rage a few years ago. A quick Internet search reveals pallets that have been “upcycled” into everything from wine bars to bookshelves, pathways (when taken apart) to lights.

Royer’s had its own purpose.

“We originally became interested in the pallets as outdoor artwork as a way to provide color and interest outside in the drearier months,” Cheryl said.

In Ephrata, Cheryl installed pallets on a wall and attached shelves to them. In Shillington, we turned pallets into display pieces for plants and giftware, with two more decorated with sunflowers by resident artist Lori Emerich, assistant manager of our Lebanon store.

In the accompanying gallery, you’ll find numerous examples of our talented staff bringing new purpose and function to old wooden pallets.

 

 

Our stores are accepting nonperishable food donations through June 30

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Amid the flowers, plants and gifts in our stores, this time of year you’ll also find a selection of food.

That’s because we’re in the midst of our annual Royer’s Stems Hunger food drive to benefit the Central Pennsylvania Food Bank and the Greater Berks Food Bank.

From June 16-30, we’re collecting nonperishable food in each of our stores. For each item you donate, we’ll give you a free carnation, up to six per visit.

Please consider donating at any of our stores.

Snapshots from our June 16 Royer’s Kids Club event; see you again on Aug. 25

A big thanks to everyone who joined us for the June 16 Royer’s Kids Club event.

Not only was it a fun time, but it also helped us kick off our annual food drive, Royer’s Stems Hunger, which runs through June 30.

We wish you a happy, safe summer and look forward to getting the gang back together for two more events this year: Aug. 25, when the theme will be fall, and Nov. 10, when we focus on our Bouquets for Books children’s book drive and our Holidays for Heroes card and coloring page drive for active and retired military members.

Meanwhile, if you haven’t officially joined the kids club, or if you have a friend of family member who might be interested, please click here for complete details.

Stems Hunger, our annual food drive, returns June 16-30

While the holidays are a time of great giving, needs in our communities exist year-round. Summers are tough for some families because the school break cuts off access to food programs.

So for the past seven summers, our “Royer’s Stems Hunger” food drive has collected nonperishable items for the Central Pennsylvania Food Bank and for the Greater Berks Food Bank. In its history, Stems Hunger has collected more than six tons of food.

Stems Hunger returns this year from June 16-30. For donating at any of our 16 stores, we’ll give you a free carnation for each item, up to six per visit.

In addition, seven Drayer Physical Therapy Institute outpatient centers in the region will collect food for Stems Hunger.

Meanwhile, the Royer’s Kids Club is helping to kick off the food drive June 16 with an event in each store. Participants are asked to bring a food item as the price of admission.

Our annual rose sale returns May 16-June 16

Roses are most closely associated with Valentine’s Day, but they are available year-round.

They’re a particularly good value in June thanks to the natural rose growing cycle, as evidenced by Royer’s annual rose sale, which coincides with National Rose Month in June.

This year’s sale runs May 16-June 16 with specials including:

  • Three roses added to any arrangement for $4;
  • One-dozen loose red, yellow, pink or rainbow roses for $15.99;
  • Two-dozen premium rose arrangement for $69.99 (normally $89.99).

A rose farm typically harvests its crop every six to eight weeks: conveniently, after the Valentine’s Day harvest comes the one for Mother’s Day. But while there’s another big crop of roses in late spring, there is not a corresponding holiday to absorb all those flowers.

Our rose sale taps into that abundant availability, which makes roses less expensive for us and, by extension, for you, our customers.

Up until the 1970s, Royer’s grew its own roses (and many other flowers) in greenhouses at our headquarters in Lebanon. But when the oil embargo hit and the price of crude oil spiked, it became cost prohibitive to operate those greenhouses.

By contrast, Bogota, Colombia, sits on a plateau, giving it year-round fall temperatures that are ideal for growing flowers.

But we leave nothing to chance. For more than 30 years, Royer’s has made at least annual trips to South America to visit the farms that provide our roses and other flowers. In fact, Royer’s may be the only local florist in the United States that visits South America in this fashion.

As we noted in this blog post, which described the efforts of Tom Royer, who is one of the Royer’s family owners: “By visiting the farms, Tom can inspect the latest crop in the field. He makes sure that the farms cut the flowers at the right maturity. He always carries his measuring tool to ensure that he’s getting the right length and head sizes for the flowers that Royer’s buys.”

Royer’s primary rose variety is called Freedom, which makes a big impression with its deep color, size (flowers range from 5 to 7 centimeters across), and long vase life.

No matter the variety, roses have similar characteristics. However, care requirements can differ whether the roses arrive in a vase, loose or in a box, as these care tips explain.

Of course, with our annual rose sale, it’s a great time to give roses as a gift to someone else or to treat yourself.

Making of Mother’s Day: Butterfly & Blooms Arrangement

Modern Mother’s Day dates to 1908, so there’s plenty of tradition associated with it. But every once in a while it’s nice to add something new to the mix.

This year, Royer’s is introducing its Butterfly & Blooms arrangement. In the accompanying gallery, you can see Royer’s employees hand-crafting the arrangement in our central design department in Lebanon.

Measuring 20 inches high and 17 inches wide, the all around arrangement comes in a 7.75-inch round blue glass vase with a diamond pattern on it. The arrangement comprises a pink lily, pink carnations, hot pink mini carnations, lavender cushion poms, purple daisy poms, peach hypericum, purple statice, and a butterfly stick in.

To order one, please click here.

School delivery: Royer’s participates in Career Vehicle Day at Hoover Elementary

Megan Zeller is a designer at Royer’s Camp Hill store, but she first joined the company as a contract driver for Valentine’s Day.

She brought that delivery experience to Career Vehicle Day at Hoover Elementary School in Camp Hill. Along with sales associate Tracy McEldowney, the Royer’s colleagues explained what it’s like to be a delivery driver to five different groups of students during the morning event.

Royer’s delivery van was among one-dozen vehicles parked outside the school and highlighted careers in everything from package delivery and TV news to police and EMS.

When delivering delicate flowers, Megan said, “We’ve got to be careful, we’ve got to be smart, we’ve got to be able to lift heavy things, too, because there are a lot of heavy things we deliver.”

With the assistance of computer tablets, Royer’s drivers load packages into their vehicles and then deliver them. Megan emphasized the importance of being reliable, “to be where you need to be on time.”

Drivers must be licensed, of course, but they also have to pass a ride-along with a Royer’s manager to confirm that they operate safely when behind the wheel.

Watching speed, checking work

“A little fun fact,” Megan told the students and their teacher, “is that when this tablet is with the driver, we can tell how fast they’re going. So we can tell if somebody is driving over the speed of 60, and how many times they’ve gone over the speed of 60, and then we can talk to them when they come back.”

The students learned that a driver deals with all manner of weather, from lovely to cold and slippery. Megan asked the students what a driver should do if delivering to a house where no one was home and the temperature was too cold to leave the flowers outside.

“Yeah, I might have to bring [the flowers] back to the shop,” she said. “I might have to go to a neighbor’s house.”

Not only do their tablets help the drivers keep track of deliveries, but they keep the store manager in the loop. If Aunt Tilly calls wondering where her order is, Megan said, the store manager can look at the status based on information shared from the tablet.

Tracy said a teacher’s adage to check work before turning it in also applies in the flower business. Clutching a big white stuffed bear and holding two Mylar balloons, she urged the students:

“Just like your teacher tells you now before you turn in your test, check your work, well, you have to keep checking your work,” Tracy said. “Because the driver has to check his work to make sure he gets the righty teddy bear to the right person.”